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Re: Left Behind by the Nationís Largest Subway System

Posted by Michael549 on Mon Jan 1 13:07:32 2018, in response to Re: Left Behind by the Nationís Largest Subway System, posted by Edwards! on Thu Dec 28 01:27:01 2017.

I believe that the collapse of the deal between the BRT and B&O Railroad, a major deadly train accident in Brooklyn and the related bankruptcy of the BRT - simply had nothing to do with any "Not In My Backyard" sentiments of the small numbers of Staten Islanders almost 100 years ago.

I believe that the collapse of the IND's Second System in the midst of the Great Depression that affected major sections of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and its connection from the G-train line to Staten Island - simply had nothing to do with any "Not In My Backyard" sentiments of the small numbers of Staten Islanders almost 90 years ago.

As I and others have said before the basic NYC subway system was in major ways completed by the 1940's with consolidations, reductions, and system-level connections occurring with little new rail construction or expansion - the exceptions being the new terminal for the #7 at the Javits Center, and the segments related to new Second Avenue Subway and its Queens extensions.

In essence the lack of direct subway service to/from Staten Island, within the southern and eastern-most sections of Queens, and the outskirts of Brooklyn are problems that have been KNOWN SINCE THE 1940's. They are "not new problems."

Robert Moses, the expansion of the car, the building of highways, the expansion of a suburban style of life, etc. all have their roots in events AFTER the 1940's even if some of the blueprints were created in the late 1920's.

My point was simple. Since none of this is a "new problem" - it does not "make sense" that the New York Times would leave out of an entire county that does not have direct subway service to Manhattan.

Of course, one can argue that a variety of transit improvements could or should be built - we do that all of the time here. It is a whole order of a different magnitude of an issue to think that "suddenly" certain parts of New York City lack subway service.

Mike



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