Home · Maps · About

Home > OTChat

[ Post a New Response | Return to the Index ]

(874601)

view threaded

St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for "gay propaganda"

Posted by Olog-hai on Wed Nov 16 23:21:10 2011

pinknews.co.uk

St. Petersburg lawmakers consider fines for “gay propaganda”

by Stephen Gray
14 November 2011, 11:40am
Legislators for the Russian city of St. Petersburg are considering new laws designed to prohibit gay “propaganda”.

The draft law introduces fines for what it terms the “propaganda of sodomy, lesbianism, bisexualism and transgenderism, to minors” and “propaganda of pedophilia”.

Fines range from a minimum of 1,000 rubles (£20) for an individual to 50,000 (£1,000) for a business.

Polina Savchenko, General manager of LGBT organization Coming Out, Russia told LGBT Asylum News:
By combining homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality into one law with sexual crimes against minors, members of the Legislative Assembly indulge in gross manipulations of public opinion. Their goal — to pass an anti-democratic law, directed at severely limiting human rights in St. Petersburg.

In the name of “public interest”, members of the Legislative Assembly decided to ignore the Federal law, the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the European Convention for Human Rights, Council of Europe Recommendations and other decrees by international organizations, of which Russia is a member. However, no public discussions were held.

It is also obvious that adoption of this law violates interests and rights of minors. Russia leads the world in the number of teenage suicides, and ignoring the issues of sexual orientation and gender identity can lead to tragic consequences.

This bill is absurd, both in terms of legal logic, and in terms of plain common sense. So what is the real goal? It is clear that adoption of this law would impose significant limitations on the activities of LGBT organizations.

Organizers of public events cannot restrict access of minors to any open area; people under 18 can be there just by chance. Consequently, it makes any public campaigns aimed at reducing xenophobia and hate crime prevention impossible.
Two other local legislatures introduced similar laws this year.

According to a 2005 poll, 43.5% of Russians supported the re-criminalization of homosexual acts between consenting adults.

In June of this year, Russian police arrested 14 gay rights campaigners in St. Petersburg. The city is Russia’s second largest, and its former capital.


Post a New Response

(874734)

view threaded

Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Nov 17 11:27:39 2011, in response to St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Wed Nov 16 23:21:10 2011.

What a surprise. No response from JZBMT.

Post a New Response

(874819)

view threaded

Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda''

Posted by SelkirkTMO on Thu Nov 17 16:26:14 2011, in response to Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda'', posted by Olog-hai on Thu Nov 17 11:27:39 2011.

Shame on him ... worrying about his OWN country first ... you ought to try that some time yourself ... plenty of really bad shit going on RIGHT HERE.

Post a New Response

(936641)

view threaded

Russian lawmakers going after "gay propaganda"

Posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 01:08:01 2012, in response to St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Wed Nov 16 23:21:10 2011.

Washington Post

Russian lawmakers target gay ‘propaganda’

By Michael Birnbaum
Published: April 17, 2012
ST. PETERSBURG — The anti-Western rhetoric that dominated Russia’s recent elections has a new focus, with gays targeted as symbols of Western permissiveness in a wave of laws being adopted across the country.

Here in St. Petersburg, a city that prides itself as the most European in Russia, the lawmaker behind a new local ban on gay “propaganda” has said that he is defending traditional Russian values against an onslaught from the West. Gay activists — two of whom were the first to go on trial this week on charges of violating the new law — counter that the rules will legitimize homophobic attitudes and aggression even as Europe and the United States move toward acceptance.

St. Petersburg’s parliament was the latest to enact such a law, which imposes fines of up to $17,000 for spreading “propaganda of sodomy, lesbianism, bisexuality or transgenderism among minors,” and the national parliament in recent weeks has taken up similar legislation. In a country where a 2010 poll by the respected Levada Center found that 74 percent of Russians deemed gays and lesbians “morally dissolute or deficient,” advocates for gay rights worry that the laws could rapidly become more common.

“The homophobic mood is growing in society, and minorities are getting more and more afraid,” said Igor Kochetkov, the head of Coming Out, a gay rights group in St. Petersburg. This week, he appeared in a cramped courtroom to defend himself against charges that he spread gay propaganda to minors when he unfurled a sign on a crowded street corner that said, “No to crimes against gays and lesbians.”

“State homophobia always existed,” he said. “Now it is becoming open.”

Two other provinces in recent months banned spreading “propaganda” about homosexuality to minors, but St. Petersburg’s law has had the biggest impact, because the city is the second largest in the country and has long been regarded as the most tolerant. In the past, St. Petersburg has allowed gay pride parades, unlike Moscow.

The man responsible for St. Petersburg’s anti-gay law, local legislator Vitaly Milonov, a member of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin’s United Russia party, said he was taking a stand for his Orthodox Christian faith — at a time when even conservative European politicians such as British Prime Minister David Cameron are pushing to legalize same-sex marriage.

“We cannot change the Bible just because it’s fashionable in Europe,” Milonov said in his St. Petersburg office, a series of rooms stuffed with gold-leaf Orthodox icons that is housed in a palace built by Czar Nicholas I. “Now is the time when Russia wants to show everybody else where its moral values are.” The Russian Orthodox Church has expressed support for the new law and called for a similar measure to be adopted on a national level.

Attacks on the West

During Russia’s presidential campaign, which ended with Putin’s victory March 4, anti-American rhetoric rocketed to heights reminiscent of the Cold War, with attacks on the new U.S. ambassador, Michael A. McFaul, suggesting that he was promoting revolution in the country. Putin said Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signaled that opposition activists should take to the streets in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

And shows of manliness still hold political resonance in a country where traditional notions of gender roles retain power.

Putin’s elaborately staged shows of virility are the stuff of legend in Russia, as he has at various points gone diving to “discover” ancient amphorae at the bottom of the Black Sea that his spokesman later conceded were planted there; ridden horses bare-chested, displaying his sculpted pecs; and offered to do judo training with French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

Now Putin’s allies across the country are pushing for laws restricting the dissemination of information about gay men and lesbians targeted at minors, “including information forming misrepresented conceptions of social equivalence of traditional and non-traditional marriage relations,” which is part of the law passed in St. Petersburg.

But Milonov said nothing in that law restricted the human rights of gays and cited his appreciation of British singer Elton John as evidence that he had nothing against gay people. Instead, Milonov said, he had more specific risks in mind.

“If a teenager who is 13 has a girlfriend and they split, in a traditional country, this boy will be looking for another girlfriend,” Milonov said. “But in a neoliberal country, some activists might tell him, ‘You know, you split. Maybe you should try a boy.’ ”

Gay rights advocates say the laws are so vague that virtually any action, such as two men holding hands, could be interpreted as propaganda by an overzealous police officer.

This week, in a stuffy St. Petersburg courtroom, Officer Valery Afanasiev stood on a raised platform, struggling to explain how the activists had been spreading propaganda when he arrested them.

“With the help of his sign,” he said. “There were minors around.”

Judge Oksana Azizova postponed her ruling, saying she needed to hear from another witness next week before she could decide the case.

The laws are “a cheap way to gain political support and political popularity,” said Dmitri Bartenev, a St. Petersburg lawyer who has fought for gay rights at the European Court of Human Rights. “Many legislators across Russia realized this is such a nice issue.”

National legislation has been proposed in Russia’s parliament several times in recent years, and it has been voted down every time. Now, Bartenev said, “I think there’s a chance it would be adopted.”

A global dispute

On the international stage, Russia has recently fought efforts to give more prominence to gay-rights issues.

Last week, Russia kept its signature off a declaration at a Group of Eight meeting that said that “human rights and fundamental freedoms are the birthright of all individuals, male and female, including lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender individuals,” objecting that gay men and lesbians do not have separate rights under international law.

“It is unacceptable to use the protection of so-called sexual minorities as an excuse to aggressively promote a certain way of conduct,” Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said, according to a report by the Interfax news service.

But opponents of the new laws said they set a dangerous precedent.

“How can we qualify what propaganda is?” asked Maxim Reznik, the head of St. Petersburg’s opposition Yabloko party. “I’m a history teacher. If I tell my students that homosexuality was very widespread in Rome, does that mean that I’m involved in propaganda?”


Post a New Response

(G00GLE)

Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for "gay propaganda"


(936660)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 04:55:29 2012, in response to Russian lawmakers going after "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 01:08:01 2012.

Sounds like the American Republicans' wet dream come true!

Post a New Response

(936664)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by SelkirkTMO on Sat Apr 28 06:37:11 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 04:55:29 2012.

Indeed. :(

Post a New Response

(936675)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Train Dude on Sat Apr 28 09:58:54 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 04:55:29 2012.

Sounds like Euro-trash is back, talking euroshit, as usual.

Post a New Response

(936678)

view threaded

Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda''

Posted by JayZeeBMT on Sat Apr 28 10:21:28 2012, in response to Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda'', posted by Olog-hai on Thu Nov 17 11:27:39 2011.

This is not news. Russia and its predecessor in interest, the Soviet Union, have a long, terrible, and well-documented history of persecuting gays. Plus, as Selkirk noted, there are enough issues stilkl facing the LGBT community here at home, as well.

Post a New Response

(936684)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 11:59:50 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Train Dude on Sat Apr 28 09:58:54 2012.

Sounds like you still don't have anything useful, or on topic to say, as usual.

Post a New Response

(936685)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by gp38/r42 chris on Sat Apr 28 12:40:01 2012, in response to Russian lawmakers going after "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 01:08:01 2012.

How crazy. Its amazing there are still people around that think you can "teach" someone to be hay. You cant teach that any more than you can "teach" a normal person to be heterosexual.

Post a New Response

(936686)

view threaded

Re: St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for ''gay propaganda''

Posted by JayMan on Sat Apr 28 13:27:18 2012, in response to St. Petersburg (Russia) lawmakers may impose fines for "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Wed Nov 16 23:21:10 2011.

See here:

The Rise of Western Civilization, from A-(almost)Z.

Post a New Response

(936693)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 13:45:27 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 04:55:29 2012.

Better watch your own back. Europe's swinging right in a big way; it's already very gay-unfriendly never mind liberal-unfriendly. National government after national government is falling, and soon you'll be under a "super-president" . . .

Post a New Response

(936695)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Rockparkman on Sat Apr 28 13:48:54 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 13:45:27 2012.

France is heading in the "right" (left) direction. If England does the same it may be possible to save Europe.

Post a New Response

(936755)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Train Dude on Sat Apr 28 17:10:22 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 11:59:50 2012.

As did you have nothing to say that might be useful. Here is a bit of constructive criticism, though, if I may. Why not change you screen name to Uerotrash7. That would make my responses unnecessary.

Post a New Response

(936768)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 17:56:38 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Train Dude on Sat Apr 28 17:10:22 2012.

Uerotrash? From what continent would that be then? Uerosia?

Post a New Response

(936772)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by Train Dude on Sat Apr 28 18:10:21 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 17:56:38 2012.

OOOOh, you caught a spelling error. I guess that means that you won't need Viagra tonight.

Post a New Response

(936822)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by JohnL on Sat Apr 28 20:43:56 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by Scorpio7 on Sat Apr 28 04:55:29 2012.

Sounds like the American Republicans' wet dream come true!

Now there you go again. American Republicans don’t have wet dreams. Never had. No self-abuse either. And very little sex. Wherein lies the problem.

Post a New Response

(936837)

view threaded

Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda''

Posted by SelkirkTMO on Sat Apr 28 20:55:54 2012, in response to Re: Russian lawmakers going after ''gay propaganda'', posted by JohnL on Sat Apr 28 20:43:56 2012.

I'm not so sure. They do seem to fap to Palin a lot. :)

Post a New Response

(1029880)

view threaded

Russian parliament votes to ban ''homosexual propaganda''

Posted by Olog-hai on Fri Jan 25 14:29:16 2013, in response to Russian lawmakers going after "gay propaganda", posted by Olog-hai on Sat Apr 28 01:08:01 2012.

Reuters

Russian parliament backs ban on "gay propaganda"

By Gabriela Baczynska and Alissa de Carbonnel
Fri Jan 25, 2013 11:53am EST
MOSCOW (Reuters) — Russia's parliament backed a draft law on Friday banning "homosexual propaganda", in what critics see as an attempt to shore up support for President Vladimir Putin in the country's largely conservative society.

Only one deputy in the State Duma lower house voted against the bill, but passions spilled over outside the chamber, where 20 people were detained after scuffles between Russian Orthodox Christians and gay activists who staged a "kiss-in" protest.

"We live in Russia, not Sodom and Gomorrah," United Russia deputy Dmitry Sablin said before the 388-1 vote in the 450-seat chamber. "Russia is a thousands-years-old country founded on its own traditional values — the protection of which is dearer to me than even oil and gas."

Veteran human rights campaigner Lyudmila Alexeyeva described the draft law as "medieval" and said it was intended to appeal to conservative voters after months of protests that have sapped Putin's popularity.

"It (the Duma) is relying on the ignorance of people who think homosexuality is some sort of distortion," she said.

The legislation has served to deepen divisions in society since Putin returned to the presidency in May and began moves seen by the opposition as designed to crackdown on dissent and smother civil society.

During the process, Putin and his supporters have underlined what they see as conservative, traditional Russian values.

He has drawn closer to the Russian Orthodox Church during this time, hoping the support of one of the most influential institutions in Russia will consolidate his grip on power.

Scuffles Outside Duma

In a sign of the passions caused by the bill, clashes broke out between supporters and opponents outside the Duma, a few hundred meters from the Kremlin in central Moscow.

Supporters, some of them holding Russian Orthodox icons and crosses, cheered and threw eggs as police hauled away gay activists, one of whom was splashed with green paint. Police said 20 people had been held.

The law must be passed in three readings by the lower house, approved by the upper house and then signed by Putin to go into force. It would ban the promotion of gay events across Russia and impose fines of up 500,000 roubles ($16,600) on organizers.

Supporters of the law welcome moves that would allow the banning of gay rights marches and complain about television and radio programs which they say show support for gay couples.

"The spread of gay propaganda among minors violates their rights," ruling United Russia party deputy, Elena Mizulina, who chairs the Duma's family issues committee. "Russian society is more conservative so the passing of this law is justified."

Putin's critics say the law is the latest in a series of legislative moves intended to stifle the opposition.

In a sign Kremlin-loyal lawmakers hope to eliminate all opposition in the house, two deputies who joined in street protests against Putin said on Friday that their Just Russia party threatened to kick them out if they continued to do so.

Public approval for Putin, who is now 60, stood in January at 62 percent, the lowest level since June 2000, an independent pollster said on Thursday.

Putin and the Church

Putin, a former KGB spy who has criticized gays for failing to help reverse Russia's population decline, has increasingly looked for support among conservative constituencies and particularly the church to offset his falling support.

The Russian Orthodox Church, resurgent since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, has spoken out against homosexuality. Putin drew closer to the clergy during the trial and sentencing this summer of three members of the Pussy Riot punk band over their protest in the country's main cathedral.

Anti-gay propaganda laws are already in place in Arkhangelsk, Novosibirsk and St Petersburg, Putin's home city, where it was used unsuccessfully to sue American singer Madonna for $10 million for promoting gay love during a concert last year.

Some deputies raised concerns the bill would be misused, asking how it would define homosexuality, and one said the house was meddling in issues beyond its scope.

"Do you seriously think that you can foster homosexuality via propaganda?" the only deputy who voted against the bill, United Russia's Sergei Kuzin, challenged its authors during the debate.

Homosexuality, punished with jail terms in the Soviet Union, was decriminalized in Russia in 1993, but much of the gay community remains underground and prejudice runs deep.

In Moscow, city authorities have repeatedly declined permission to stage gay parades and gay rights' allies have often ended in arrests and clashes with anti-gay activists.

(Additional reporting by Maria Tsvetkova and Alissa de Carbonnel; Writing by Gabriela Baczynska; Editing by Myra MacDonald)


Post a New Response


[ Return to the Message Index ]