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USA USA USA

Posted by B68 SLOW POKE on Thu Dec 7 12:46:06 2017

Says it ALL.
eagle_has_landed

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(1480182)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 12:53:10 2017, in response to USA USA USA, posted by B68 SLOW POKE on Thu Dec 7 12:46:06 2017.

A Lockheed Galaxy says it all?

I do often wish they had made the L-500 version. The USA with two jumbo jets would have been quite awesome.



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(1480233)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 15:01:59 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 12:53:10 2017.

Meh. T-tails = teh suck (and unnecessary with wing-mounted engines)

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(1480255)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Bill Newkirk on Thu Dec 7 15:19:25 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 12:53:10 2017.

The "Spruce Goose" as referred to by Steve Allen as the Concrete Canary ! lol



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(1480257)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 15:22:54 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 15:01:59 2017.

Well, I wouldn't want the DC9 to have looked like the Caravelle.

And having flown in lots of DC9s and 727s, and a few Embraer ERJs and BAC-111s, I don't particularly see how a T-tail is less safe than any other tail configuration. (I never got to fly in a Trident or VC-10 though.)

The British Aerospace 146 also has a T-tail and wing-mounted engines. Perhaps it has to do with the "shoulder" wing position?

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(1480258)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 15:24:36 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Bill Newkirk on Thu Dec 7 15:19:25 2017.

I have to wonder if it would have been possible to reconfigure that big thing with eight jets and swept wings, for terrestrial takeoff too.

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(1480315)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 20:33:42 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 15:22:54 2017.

I did not mean to imply that the t-tail was not safe (AS261 was a fluke). I just don't like the way the vertical stabilizer looks with the horizontal up top. I had my share of t-tail flights, my first 9 flights were t-tails (2xEastern 727, 7xOzark DC-9). the spell was broken in April 1973, when I flew ORD-IAH on an AA 707 (alas, the return flight was a 727). Strangely, every one of my flights in or out of LGA (16 total flights) were on t-tails (DC-9/727/MD-82).



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(1480316)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 20:34:32 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 15:24:36 2017.

IIRC, it was made of wood, wonder if the wings would support jet engines.

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(1480325)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 20:46:38 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 20:34:32 2017.

The H4 was made almost completely of birch wood; the reason there was due to the WWII restrictions on aluminum.

The 28-cylinder Pratt & Whitney R4360 "Wasp Major" radial engines weighed about 3,800 lbs each by themselves, and there were eight of them; the JT9D (747 engine) weighs about 8,600 lbs, but you wouldn't need eight of them to power something like the H4. (The JT3D, the Boeing 707's low-bypass turbofan engine, weighs about 4,650 lbs.)

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(1480327)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 20:50:23 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by FYBklyn1959 on Thu Dec 7 20:33:42 2017.

My father got to fly in Caravelles; perhaps it was his perception, but he claimed the takeoff angle was steeper than on later jets. I do like the interesting tail configuration on that one, as well as the retro look of the tail fin itself.



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(1480470)

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Re: USA USA USA

Posted by FYBklyn1959 on Fri Dec 8 09:05:15 2017, in response to Re: USA USA USA, posted by Olog-hai on Thu Dec 7 20:50:23 2017.

Yeah, that was a strange bird, alright. I think UA retired their last ones by 1970, which predated my interest in airliners (started circa 1972).



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